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Artist

NOFX

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Biography

NOFX /ˌnɛfˈɛks/ is an American punk rock band from Los Angeles, California. They were formed in 1983 by vocalist/bassist Fat Mike and guitarist Eric Melvin. Drummer Erik Sandin joined NOFX shortly after. In 1991, El Hefe joined to play lead guitar and trumpet, rounding out the current line-up. The band rose to popularity with their fifth studio album Punk in Drublic (1994).

NOFX's mainstream success was signified by a growing interest in punk rock during the 1990s, but unlike many of their contemporaries (including Bad Religion, Green Day and The Offspring), they have never been signed to a major label. NOFX has released twelve studio albums, fifteen extended plays and a number of seven-inch singles. Their latest studio album, First Ditch Effort, was released on October 7, 2016. The group has sold over 8 million records worldwide, making them one of the most successful independent bands of all time. NOFX broadcast their own show on Fuse TV entitled NOFX: Backstage Passport.

In 1983, guitarist Eric Melvin met bassist/vocalist Mike Burkett (Fat Mike) and started the band under the name NO-FX, after a Boston hardcore punk band called Negative FX. At this time, they were joined by drummer Erik "Smelly" Sandin. NOFX's first recording was a demo from 1984, entitled Thalidomide Child produced by Germs drummer Don Bolles, which did not sell many copies, but is now an incredibly rare collector's item. Fat Mike once claimed that no copies existed. It was announced in 2011 that the demo would be re-released and in 2012 it finally saw a release. The group released its self-titled debut extended play NOFX on Mystic Records in 1985, which was later re-released in 1992 as part of the Maximum Rocknroll CD. Mystic's Mark Wilkins, who handled promotion on their first national tour with Dr. Know told Wild Times "I knew those guys had something special. In the middle of the tour Dr. Know's van broke down forcing them to quit the tour but NOFX kept on going and actually completed the tour. That was very rare and in my mind an example of the kind of discipline it takes to be successful."

The band's line-up had undergone a number of changes; however, the original three members had reunited. For a year, Erik "Smelly" Sandin left the band and was replaced by Scott Sellers, and later by Scott Aldahl. Dave Allen was in the band for about four months, until he died in a car accident. In 1986, the band released the extended play So What If We're on Mystic!. Dave Casillas joined the band on second guitar in 1987 and was featured on the extended play The P.M.R.C. Can Suck on This, attacking the PMRC's campaign for music censorship. The original cover was an edited S&M photo; the cover for the re-released version was changed to a photo of Eric Melvin. Prior to the release of Liberal Animation, a compilation of 14 early NOFX songs was released on Mystic Records. The album was self-titled, and featured the songs from the NOFX and So What If We're on Mystic! extended plays. The album is quite rare and only printed around 1,000 copies. The price of the album ranges from $80–$300. The album's cover was a redesigned version of the cover from the NOFX extended play.

NOFX recorded Liberal Animation in 1988 with Brett Gurewitz of Bad Religion. Although the title and some of the album's lyrics mocked vegetarianism and animal rights, Fat Mike says that he became a vegetarian after writing the Liberal Animation album. The album was re-released in 1991 on Gurewitz's label Epitaph Records. Casillas left the band shortly after the recording of Liberal Animation and was replaced by Steve Kidwiller (a.k.a. "Steve the Caucasian"). The band released its second studio album S&M Airlines through Epitaph in 1989.

In 1991, NOFX released its third studio album, Ribbed. Shortly after the album was released, Steve Kidwiller left the band, and Aaron Abeyta (a.k.a. "El Hefe") joined the group. With Abeyta, the band recorded the extended play The Longest Line, followed by the studio album White Trash, Two Heebs and a Bean, released in May and November 1992 respectively. Also in 1992, NOFX's former label Mystic Records released Maximum Rocknroll, which compiles early singles and demo songs and is actually a reissue of their 1989 long-out of print compilation tape E Is for Everything. Although the band claims that Maximum Rocknroll was not released with their consent, it is listed on the discography of their website.

In 1994, punk rock entered the mainstream with the success of The Offspring's Smash, Bad Religion's Stranger than Fiction, Rancid's Let's Go and Green Day's Dookie, and NOFX had a commercial breakthrough with the release of its fifth studio album Punk in Drublic, their best-selling album to date. The album was certified gold with support from Los Angeles-based radio station KROQ, which played the song "Leave It Alone". A music video was made for the song but did not receive airplay on MTV. Fat Mike was quoted saying "We made the ‘Leave It Alone' video, and we decided not to send it to MTV. We just didn't want to be a part of that machine, of that ‘punk wave.'" Due to the success of Punk in Drublic, NOFX received many offers to sign with major record labels, but the band declined the offers. The following year, the band released its first live album I Heard They Suck Live!!. In the liner notes the band explicitly rejected the advances of major record labels and radio airplay, stating "We've been doing fine all these years without you so leave us alone!" Punk in Drublic is now considered a classic punk album by fans and critics alike.

Punk in Drublic was followed by the 1996 CD Heavy Petting Zoo, whose LP companion featured different cover art and the name Eating Lamb. The artwork for the CD featured a man holding a sheep, while the LP depicted the same man in a 69 position with the sheep. The Eating Lamb version was banned from sale in Germany due to its obscene cover art. The LP version did not achieve the success of its predecessor, although it was the first NOFX record to achieve a position on the Billboard charts, reaching number 63. Fat Mike stated: "Weird record. I thought it was the coolest record when we finished it, but a few months later I wasn't so sure. Some of those songs are kinda weird. I like the cover a lot though. I think it sold well in Belgium."

In 1997, the band released So Long and Thanks for All the Shoes, a return to faster punk, as exemplified by the frenetic opening track, "It's My Job to Keep Punk Rock Elite."

NOFX released The Decline, an 18-minute single-track extended play which served as a fiery and cynical social commentary in 1999. The Decline, clocking in at 18:23, is the third-longest punk song ever recorded (after PMX's 24.04 minute long "The Ballad of Tony Montana" and Crass' 20-minute song "Yes Sir, I Will").

NOFX released its eighth studio album Pump Up the Valuum in 2000. It was the band's final album released through Epitaph, as the band decided to sign to Fat Mike's own label Fat Wreck Chords.

In 2002, the band recorded BYO Split Series Volume III, a split album with Rancid, in which Rancid covered NOFX songs and NOFX covered Rancid songs.

NOFX released its ninth studio album The War on Errorism in 2003, an album of political songs. It became the start of its anti-George W. Bush campaign. Fat Mike organized the website punkvoter.com, compiled two chart-topping Rock Against Bush albums, and started a Rock Against Bush U.S. tour. The song "Separation of Church and Skate" from the album was featured in the game Tony Hawk's Underground.

In February 2005, the band launched the NOFX

Timeline